CCLD Research Project



In recent years, the Research Project has funded action research connected to professional development provided through Math on the “Planes”®. Click here to see the research summaries for the recipients for the Grant Awards.

 

Founders


Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities created a unique research project. It began in the mid 1980’s and continues today partly because of the legacy of three wonderful and dedicated educators.

Gertrude Myers

Gertrude was a special education professor at Denver University and then at Northeastern Illinois University in the 70’s and 80’s. Gertrude significantly impacted the teacher preparation program and touched many special education teachers in Colorado through her classes and her dedicated work as a CCLD board member.

Gertrude approached the Council for Learning Disabilities board and the Colorado Department of Education Special Education Services Unit with a plan to raise money to award yearly grants to teachers who were conducting research in their classrooms. She envisioned creating resources from foundation and private contributions to give out several awards every year to deserving applicants. Over a period of time from the late 80’s until her death in the early 90’s, her dream become reality as the CCLD board developed an active research committee to award yearly grants. An account was opened to fund the projects and a teacher guidebook was developed.

In the Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities Research Project, Gertrude created a legacy. When she knew she was dying, she called several CCLD board members to her bedside and made them promise that they would see that the research project continued. After her death, Art Myers, Gertrude’s husband, set up a memorial fund for the CCLD Research Project.

Ellie Smucker

Ellie was a special education teacher in Cherry Creek School District in the 1970’s and early 80’s. She was not only one of the early LD specialists but also one of the founding members of the Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities. She served on the board for several years and was instrumental in bringing the National CLD Conference to Denver in the fall of 1980. This provided the opportunity for many CCLD members to meet and get acquainted with some of the leaders in the field of Learning Disabilities. This provided the strong base of dedicated officers who built the Colorado chapter into one of the premier CLD branches in the country, a tradition that continues today.

Ellie died of breast cancer in the mid 1980’s just as CCLD was beginning to develop its Teacher Research Project. Ellie’s husband make the project one of the beneficiaries of memorials for Ellie, and the funds have continued to support classroom-based research for two decades. This has proved to be s a lasting memory to one of CCLD’s important founders and early LD teachers.

Ellie’s family continues to support the Research Grant Project. In November, 2011 Ellie’s husband, Bill Smucker, donated $100 in the memory of Charles Woodward, husband of Avaril Weidemeier, long-time Special Education Coordinator in the Cherry Creek School District. Bill also donated $400.00 on behalf of Ellie’s son, Chris Tilden, his wife, and four children

Beatrice Fern

Bea Fern, the mother of Lois Adams (long time CLD member and CCLD board member), was a teacher in every cell of her body. As she often said, she’d rather teach than eat! Her favorite students were those who had trouble learning. She had a wealth of stories about her experiences as teacher/principal/janitor in a one room school outside of Chicago. One of the stories focused on the boy who couldn’t read or write no matter what she tried. She just couldn’t get him out of her mind and often wished she had known about learning disabilities at the time she taught him. She must have, however, done something right because, as an adult, he built her a beautiful cupboard for her dining room!

When she died in 1991, Lois asked that memorial gifts be sent to CCLD for the Teacher Research Project so other teachers would have support to try promising practices in their classrooms just as Mrs. Fern had done. Contributions to her memorial were added to those of Ellie Smucker to finance the project.

And so it is that CCLD, an organization that has always been run by strong, dedicated teachers has a tangible legacy to give to teachers to encourage them to explore and evaluate promising practices for students who are struggling learners. It is gratifying to know that the legacy continues as a fitting homage to three outstanding teachers.

 

2013 Research Award Recipients


The Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities (CCLD) honored five outstanding research-award recipients from our recent Math on the “Planes” (MOP) conference in February of 2013. The focus of this outstanding conference, through the lens of part-to-whole reasoning, was on diagnostic assessment, meaningful learning objectives, the Colorado Academic Standards, learning trajectories, and intervention.

Working together with Adams State, CCLD designed a rigorous Math Intervention Certificate (MIC) wherein participants in the February MOP Conference and the subsequent June Boot Camp could either earn stand-alone credit through Adams State or earn credit toward the MIC. The research project from our February conference required participants to administer the Numeracy Project Assessment (NumPa: Diagnostic Interview), electronically record and score the assessment, select relevant learning objectives from the Colorado Academic Standards or math learning trajectories, and suggest interventions utilizing resources from the New Zealand maths website.

Each of the following award recipients received a free one-year membership to the national Council for Learning Disabilities (CLD) and a free one-year membership to CCLD. Following is a description of our award recipients and their projects:

  • Our first award recipient, Ms. Cassandra Parker, teaches kindergarten through fifth grade at Peakview Elementary in Cherry Creek School District. For her project, Cassandra worked with a fifth grade student who demonstrated some evidence of part-to-whole reasoning, but often applied her reasoning incorrectly. As a result of Cassandra’s participation in MOP, she was able to directly strengthen her ability to assess and understand the mathematical strategies that her student was using.
    Cassandra encourages all teachers of struggling students to not only push themselves to learn about different interventions, but to also focus efforts on essential diagnostic skills. Cassandra reminds us that, “All kids can be successful! Sometimes students are not making the progress we expect because we as teachers have not properly diagnosed their specific skill deficits and in turn, have not implemented the correct interventions targeting those deficits. Taking the time to administer specific diagnostic assessments before beginning intervention can help ensure that each and every student soars.”


  • Ms. Gayle Niss, a math intervention in the St. Vrain Valley School District, also received a research award. Gayle supports K-12 special education teachers and students across the 50 schools in the St. Vrain district. For her project, Gayle selected an eighth grade student receiving services in an alternate educational environment. Second language issues and attention challenges hindered his math achievement. Her assessment enabled her to pinpoint her student’s academic needs and select a variety of promising interventions directly related to those needs.
    Gayle has embraced the Colorado Academic Standards for her struggling learners, stating, “I've come to believe in teaching the Colorado Academic Standards to struggling learners. The more we encourage our students to embrace the characteristics of being a mathematician, the better they will be able to perform mathematics. We need to challenge our students and expect great things from them. The standards of perseverance, reasoning, modeling, and precision are characteristics that will also support struggling learners beyond the math classroom and into life.”


  • Another award recipient, Ms. Lori Pruett, is in her third year of teaching sixth - eighth grade special education at Brush Middle School in Brush Colorado. Lori teaches reading, math, and writing to students who score below the 3rd percentile on standardized testing. Like Ms. Niss, above, Lori also chose to work with an 8th grade student for her project. Once again, second language issues hindered this hard-working student in her ability to succeed in mathematics. Using several carefully selected games from the New Zealand Math website, Lori saw fascinating results as her student mastered objectives directly related to the assessment.
    When asked about words for her fellow teachers, Lori cited a quote from Michael J Fox: “If a child can't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn." Lori continued, “The art of teaching is understanding the subject we are teaching in many different ways. Giving students the opportunities to learn and express what they have learned is not just about completing the assignment. Struggling learners need to have the opportunity to express the knowledge in a way that is meaningful to them and for many it is not a written assignment or a test. Incorporating ideas outside the box will allow them to learn and you to grow as a teacher.”


  • Ms. Mary Ziegler Zimmerman teaches grades six through eight at Grant Beacon Middle School in Denver. For her outstanding project, Mary worked with two struggling sixth grade students. After completing her project and then implementing her selected interventions, Mary shared the following, “One (student) absolutely refused to do his math work at the beginning of the school year, and the other had such intense math anxiety, that he often had breakdowns in his class that occurred before math. After working with both of them individually, I decided to bring them together to play the Four Kings Game. These students who previously wanted nothing to do with math were giggling together, enjoying themselves, and when the bell rang, asking for more! Hence, my advice to teachers of struggling learners is to gather a deep understanding of students' strengths and needs, and precisely target instruction to make the biggest impact for your students. Oh, and never give up!”


  • Our final award recipient, Ms. Annemarie Dempsey, teaches at Campus Middle School in Cherry Creek School District. Annemarie teaches sixth graders and eighth graders with learning, emotional, attention, and hearing disabilities. For her project, Annemarie assessed a first grader experiencing significant challenges in math and demonstrating many avoidance behaviors as a result. Annemarie’s analysis of the results of the diagnostic assessment was deeply insightful and she chose a number of math game activities from the New Zealand Maths website as possible interventions for her student. Regarding Math on the “Planes” and next steps, Annemarie concluded, “As a special education math teacher, I feel grateful to have experienced Math on the Planes as well as to have given the NumPa. Both will make me a better math teacher. The NumPa, when given to all my students, will help to give me an in-depth understanding my students’ strengths and needs. Its connection with the New Zealand Maths website will help to provide many activities that will address the newly identified needs of my students. Math on the Planes opened my eyes to looking at numbers differently.
    For beginning teachers, indeed, for all teachers, Annemarie offers the following words: “As a teachers of students with disabilities we face many obstacles. Unfortunately, all those obstacles may encourage me to think that I am not making a difference. When that happens I fall back on two quotes. The first, by Robert Louis Stevenson, “Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap, but by the seeds that you plant.” It reminds me that I may not see immediate results from all the work I do with my students. However, our work together is good and right and it will eventually bloom. The second quote was posted on a wall when I first graduated from college and I worked in a residential treatment facility for students with emotional disabilities. “The kids who are the hardest to love are the ones who need to be loved the most.” This quote helps me get through those tough days. It helps me remember that even though some students may resist help, they are the ones who most need the support, guidance, instruction, and understanding so that they can reach their full potential.”

In closing, the projects highlighted above are indicative of the outstanding work and efforts of all who participated in this rigorous assignment. The variety of student needs, the efforts of our participants, and above all, the learning that surfaced for all educators, served once again to amaze and inspire our ongoing efforts at CCLD to enhance the achievement of all learners.

Dr. Patty Meek
Research Coordinator/Colorado Council For Learning Disabilities (CCLD)

 

2012 Research Award Recipient, Marci Hellman


The board of the Colorado Council of Learning Disabilities is honored to announce Marci Hellman as our Outstanding Researcher Award Recipient for 2012. Marci is currently an elementary math content curriculum specialist in Jefferson County, a position she has held for twelve years.

In conjunction with our 2012 Math on the “Planes” workshop lead by Dr. Jere Confrey and Dr. Alan Maloney, Marci conducted an action research project on the Equipartitioning Learning Trajectory, which is a relevant precursor to understanding rational numbers. Working extensively with a kindergarten student, Marci explored issues of equipartitioning through a series of increasingly complex student tasks, observations and interviews with the student.*

Upon completing her project, Marci wrote, “My work with Addy illustrates that young children are able to use their developing understanding of quantity to equipartition reasonably sized sets into as many as four groups.” She continued, “Through the course of this independent study, I am now considering the idea that work on the Equipartitioning Learning Trajectory can actually enhance the development of reasoning in addition and subtraction.”

Marci enjoys working with teachers and stated recently that when a teacher says, "I think about math in a completely different way now", Marci knows the teacher will change the way she or he teaches mathematics to children. Marci urges all teachers to understand that regarding mathematics instruction, “It has to make sense to kids and you're not done until it does.”

To Marci Hellman, the board of the Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities extends its heartiest congratulations for her excellent research project!

 

2011 Research Award Recipients


Our first research award recipient is Bertha Orona. Bertha has been teaching at Adams City Middle School for 19 years. This past spring, as part of her Math on the “Planes”® “geometrical thinking” project, she elected to work with a middle school student, Wilson, focusing on helping him develop a deep understanding of angle measurements and angle sums across a variety of triangle types. Her careful use of multiple enactive (hands on) and iconic (picture representations) strategies helped Wilson successfully develop the skills necessary to effectively articulate his reasoning regarding angles (including concepts, measurements, and relationships), as well as transfer his new knowledge to similar triangles. This was a tremendous step forward for Wilson, who had long struggled with mathematics reasoning beyond the rote-computational level.

As Bertha recently wrote, “Even though teaching can be very stressful and tiring, the best reward for me is being able to individually reach my students wherever their particular needs may be and hopefully introducing them to a love for learning. Seeing the sparkle in their eyes and the big smile when they "get it", makes all those hours of planning and grading worth the time.” Bertha also offered the following advice to new teachers coming into the profession: “Don’t give up on your students. Even though some of them may work very hard to make your day difficult, we always need to keep in mind that there is some reason that they need that attention--whether it is that they do not understand the content or that they may be struggling with a personal difficulty. We always need to be sensitive to what our students may be struggling to figure out. Our profession goes beyond what is going on in the classroom. Letting students know that we believe in them is the first step to being able to reach them.”

Our second research award recipient is Joan Klein. A native of eastern Colorado, Joan has been teaching for 25 years in the La Junta/Rocky Ford part of our state. She has spent the majority of that time working with middle school and high school students in science and, most recently, mathematics. Joan chose to work with a high school student, Brian, as part of her Math on the “Planes”® project. Brian, having struggled notably in mathematics over the past two years, struggled more so when required to articulate the logic and meaning behind geometrical concepts. His struggles manifested themselves in very high anxiety in this area, along with a sense of “I’ll never get it.” Joan chose to focus, with Brian, on the concept of area in geometry, both with two-dimensional polygons and moving eventually to nets. Using an enactive (cut out models), and iconic (isomorphic dot paper) instructional approach with Brian, he was eventually able to effectively articulate the meaning(s) behind related geometric algorithms, thus transferring his new understanding(s) to symbolic, formulaic representations. Brian’s new understanding(s) were also apparent in his standardized assessment data.

Joan shared that following her participation in Math on the “Planes”® (February, 2011) and her subsequent work with Brian, she has “changed her whole approach” to teaching mathematics. Her new approach of “assisting students to articulate their knowledge and listening,” both aided by that unassuming magic question of, “What are you thinking?”, has reaffirmed her in her endeavors to focus even more on slowing her pace, focusing on big ideas, and employing more ‘hands on’ methods in her mathematics instruction. Joan also stated that, as related to Rocky Ford Schools’ ongoing efforts to enhance learning for their students, the insights gained from CCLD’s Math on the “Planes”® conference in February of 2011 offered “incredible insights” to participating teachers from her area of the state.

To both Bertha Orona and Joan Klein, the board of the Colorado Council for Learning Disabilities extends its heartiest congratulations for their excellent research projects!